• Emotions. From Cases to Theories Emotions: From Cases to Theories
    Vol 12 No 35 (2019)

    During the last three decades, emotions have become a critical topic in several branches of the contemporary philosophical debate, ranging from metaethics and value epistemology to philosophical psychology and normative ethics. Emotions are supposed to play a crucial role in our life, with a strong impact on our first-person experience and our social interactions, on our choices and values but also our implicit attitudes and unintentional behavior. Thinking of emotions, philosophers have focused on affective phenomena as diverse as disgust with the smell of rotten meat, awe for a magnificent musical composition, fear of snakes, hope for the future of a cherished friend, and embarrassment over a slight deviation from a social norm. It is indeed a theoretical challenge to account for the full spectrum of what ordinarily falls under the term “emotion” and to identify its place in the broader affective domain, to the extent that the very unity of the category is disputed. [read more]

  • Teleology and World from Different Perspectives: Philosophy of Mind and Transcendental Phenomenology Teleology and World from Different Perspectives: Philosophy of Mind and Transcendental Phenomenology
    Vol 11 No 34 (2018)

    edited by Rodolfo Giorgi, Danilo Manca.

    During the last century, most philosophers of science have tried to expunge teleological explanations from the fields of epistemology: based on an anti-metaphysical attitude, they hold purposes and goals to be of religious and spiritual nature, thereby obstacles to any effective comprehension of biological processes. Accordingly, teleological categories have been abandoned in many ways in favor of mechanical causes and non-teleological processes: since Darwin demonstrated that no teleology is required in order to explain the natural world, causal explanations became the only tools to investigate natural processes [read more]

  • The Learning Brain and the Classroom The Learning Brain and the Classroom
    Vol 11 No 33 (2018)

     edited by Alex Tillas, Byron Kaldis

    During the last couple of decades, a number of public policy and university initiatives triggered a drastic increase in neuroscientific research. The advances in neuroscience increased public awareness and gave rise to a “brain turn” for many disciplines in the humanities. This special issue brings together papers highlighting the prospects and challenges of recent advances in brain sciences regarding the cognitive process of learning and, ultimately, education. At the same time, this special issue aims at bringing a degree of conceptual clarity to related discussions.

  • Beyond Toleration? Inconsistency and Pluralism in the Empirical Sciences Beyond Toleration? Inconsistency and Pluralism in the Empirical Sciences
    Vol 10 No 32 (2017)

    edited by María del Rosario Martínez-Ordaz, Luis Estrada-González

    Nowadays it is recognized that, at least for methodological purposes, entertaining pluralism in the study of science can offer a great number of benefits. From the different pluralist positions, a lot has been said about empirical adequacy, refutability and explanatory power, yet consistency has not been equally dealt with. At the moment, it is commonly accepted that inconsistencies can be more frequent in scientific development than the traditional philosophy of science could have expected. What the volume shows is that one should be ready to expect new ways of tolerating inconsistencies as the relation between logic and philosophy of science ripens.

  • The Enactive Approach to Qualitative Ontology: In Search of New Categories The Enactive Approach to Qualitative Ontology: In Search of New Categories
    Vol 9 No 31 (2016)

    edited by Roberta Lanfredini, Nicola Liberati, Andrea Pace Giannotta, Elena Pagni

    This Special Issue is dedicated to building a bridge between different disciplines concerned in the investigation of the qualitative dimension of experience and reality. The two main objectives of the Issue can be summarized as follows: 1) to elucidate the need for a revision of categories to account for the qualitative dimension in various disciplines; 2) to explore the implications of the enactivist view for a relational and ecological account of the qualitative dimensions of life and cognition.

  • In Silico Modeling: the Human Factor In Silico Modeling: the Human Factor
    Vol 9 No 30 (2016)

     edited by Marta Bertolaso, Miles MacLeod

    Undoubtedly, the future of biology is as a technoscience, in which technical and engineering expertise are as important as biological knowledge and experimental skill. But what can we really expect from technology? How effective will it be and what impact will it have on biological knowledge? How will the role of scientists as human beings be transformed by this epochal transformation? How autonomous will the role of technology be with respect to human contributions in driving research? In this Special Issue we try to lay some foundations for answering these questions by focusing on in silico models.

  • Causation and Mental Causation Causation and Mental Causation
    Vol 8 No 29 (2015)

    edited by Raffaella Campanaer, Carlo Gabbani

    It has been suggested that our conundrum concerning the possibility of mind affecting the physical world has been strongly influenced, among other things, by metaphysical choices such as considering the physical and the mental two different kinds of substance (albeit connected and interacting), or assuming a model for physical causality based on material contact, a model that is not plausible for the res cogitans. This issue of Humana.Mente aims to support and stimulate interaction and exchange between the philosophy of causality and the research directly or indirectly dealing with mental causation, presenting a wide range of reflections and possible orientations.

  • Experts and Expertise Interdisciplinary Issues Experts and Expertise Interdisciplinary Issues
    Vol 8 No 28 (2015)

    edited by Elisabetta Lalumera, Giovanni Tuzet

    Today the role of experts is pervasive in the everyday life: governments and groups routinely delegate economic and technological decisions to experts, and the evaluation of academic and scientific institutions is demanded to expert peers. The aim of this issue is to collect a variety of points of view on the topics of experts and expertise, with a special focus on the following issues: (i) what experts are; (ii) how expert cognition differs from layperson cognition; (iii) to what extent it is rational to trust experts; (iv) how it is correct to characterize experts’ disagreement.

  • Origin and Evolution of Language Origin and Evolution of Language
    Vol 7 No 27 (2014)

    edited by Francesco Ferretti, Ines Adornetti

    Understanding the origin and evolution of language has been defined as the hardest problem in science. From the perspective adopted in this special issue of Humana.Mente devoted to the origin and evolution of language, the fact that we can be proud of the extraordinary abilities that characterize our species does not contradict the notion that, indeed, these abilities can be attributed to the animal nature of human beings. The articles collected in this special issue reflect the inherently interdisciplinary nature of research on the origin and the evolution of language.

  • Reframing the Debate on Human Enhancement Reframing the Debate on Human Enhancement
    Vol 7 No 26 (2014)

    edited by Fiorella Battaglia, Antonio Carnevale

    How do we categorize human enhancement? How do we decide that a certain intervention is an enhancement? How do we establish that interventions as diverse as a prosthesis, a drug and a technological support as an implant may all be labelled as enhancements? The essays included in the present issue integrate concrete, empirical examples and try to move forward the discussion on human enhancement based on these examples. By presenting new empirical findings on the topic, these essays examine how these can lead to philosophical problems.

  • Meinong Strikes Again. Return to Impossible Objects 100 Years Later Meinong Strikes Again. Return to Impossible Objects 100 Years Later
    Vol 6 No 25 (2013)

    edited by Laura Mari, Michele Paolini Paoletti

    The destiny of Meinongianism in the Anglo-American analytic philosophy in the first half of the 20th Century is summarized by G. Ryle, 1972’s well-known remark:" Let us frankly concede from the start that Gegenstandstheorie itself is dead, buried and not going to be resurrected." Forty-one years after Ryle’s prophecy, it seems that Meinongianism is still vital and that many philosophers – even without considering themselves Meinongians – are coming to conclusions that seem to be quite near to (or at least compatible with) Meinongianism.

  • Pointing: Where Embodied Cognition Meets the Symbolic Mind Pointing: Where Embodied Cognition Meets the Symbolic Mind
    Vol 6 No 24 (2013)

    edited by Massimiliano L. Cappuccio

    There is something special and unique in the pointing gesture, something that – like Michelangelo’s index finger in The Creation of Adam - suggests a transcendent upswing. But exploring how transcendence has been concretely produced by pointing, i.e. understanding the concrete operations that made that upswing historically possible, seems way more important than abstractly stating the supposedly higher status of pointing in its transcendence. Discussing these concrete operations means facing complex conceptual problems situated at the intersection of “language, culture, and cognition”.

  • Experimental Perspectives on Philosophical Pragmatics Experimental Perspectives on Philosophical Pragmatics
    Vol 5 No 23 (2012)

    edited by Francesca Ervas, Elisabetta Gola

    In the last years, plenty of studies have brought classical pragmatic theories in front of the tribunal of experience to test their power of explanation and prediction. The result has been the growth of a flourishing interdiscipline, called “Experimental Pragmatics”. The aim of this issue is to discuss the main empirical results of Experimental Pragmatics and to explore its theoretical influence on research subjects, such as figures of speech, presuppositions, translation, etc. How and to what extent do experimental methods and conceptual analysis interact in pragmatics? Which consequences does this experimental turn bear upon theorizing in pragmatics?

  • Making Sense of Gender, Sex, Race, and the Family Making Sense of Gender, Sex, Race, and the Family
    Vol 5 No 22 (2012)

    edited by Elena Casetta, Vera Tripodi

    Historically, the inquiry into the nature of gender has been mainly focused on the relation between gender and sex, but recently an increasing number of analytic feminists is coming to consider the status of gender also in its correlation with the categories of race and family. The contributions presented in this volume share the claim that not only gender but sex too is not a mere matter of biology: both sex and gender are largely the product of the complex interaction of social processes and categories, and our concepts of them are shaped by social meanings.

  • Between Two Images. The Manifest and Scientific Conception of the Human Being, 50 Years On Between Two Images. The Manifest and Scientific Conception of the Human Being, 50 Years On
    Vol 5 No 21 (2012)

    edited by Carlo Gabbani

    The relationship between common-sense representations of man and the world and scientific representations of them were widely debated in XXth century culture. This issue of Humana.Mente aims to present: (i) theoretical and original contributions on the very idea of scientific and manifest “images”; (ii) critical re-examinations of Sellars’s elaboration of this topic, and an analysis of his relevant texts; (iii) overviews of contemporary debates on this topic, as well as on the related topic of the relationship between philosophy and the sciences.

  • Philosophy of Self Deception Philosophy of Self Deception
    Vol 5 No 20 (2012)

    edited by Patrizia Pedrini

    We sense that perhaps many decisions we made — maybe even more than we would be willing to acknowledge - have been made upon beliefs that are false, and yet are strongly, sometimes even irresistibly wanted, or desired. Its disconcerting hallmark lies in the fact that we somehow seem to come to believe a proposition that we should at least doubt is likely to be true, and that we seem to do that because of a strong  motivation to acquire that false belief. The phenomenon of self-deception is one of those topics that, perhaps more than others, is capable of intriguing and fascinating those who decide to devote to it a part of their studies and research.

  • Composition, Counterfactuals and Causation Composition, Counterfactuals and Causation
    Vol 4 No 19 (2011)

     

    edited by M. Carrara, R. Ciuni, G. Lando

  • Weltbilder and Philosophy
    Vol 4 No 18 (2011)

     

    edited by Renata Badii, Enrica Fabbri

  • The Legacy of Gestalt Psychology
    Vol 4 No 17 (2011)

     

    edited by Riccardo Luccio

  • History, Science and Technology History, Science and Technology
    Vol 4 No 16 (2011)

     

    edited by Matteo Gerlini

  • Agency: From Embodied Cognition To Free Will Agency: From Embodied Cognition To Free Will
    Vol 4 No 15 (2011)

     

    edited by Duccio Manetti, Silvano Zipoli Caiani

  • The Body: The Role of Human Sciences The Body: The Role of Human Sciences
    Vol 4 No 14 (2010)

     

    edited by Alessandro Mariani

  • Physics and Metaphysics
    Vol 4 No 13 (2010)

     

    edited by Claudio Calosi

  • Passion(s) for Politics
    Vol 4 No 12 (2010)

     

    edited by Elena Acuti

  • Psychology and Psychologies: Which Epistemology?
    Vol 3 No 11 (2009)

     

    edited by Marco Fenici

  • Philosophy of Economics
    Vol 3 No 10 (2009)


    edited by Laura Beritelli, Mauro Rossi

  • Medicine: Philosophy and History
    Vol 3 No 9 (2009)


    edited by Matteo Borri

  • Models of Time Models of Time
    Vol 3 No 8 (2009)


    edited by Roberto Ciuni

  • Per una conversazione sull'etica Humana.Mente issue 7
    Vol 2 No 7 (2008)


    Per una conversazione sull'etica

    edited by Scilla Bellucci, Laura Beritelli

  • Humana.Mente issue 6
    Vol 2 No 6 (2008)


    Filosofia e Scienze del Vivente. Prospettive Storiche e Teoriche

    edited by Daniele Romano, Guido Caniglia

  • verso una neuro-filosofia Humana.Mente issue 5
    Vol 2 No 5 (2008)

    Verso una Neuro-Filosofia?

  • Humana.Mente issue 4
    Vol 2 No 4 (2008)
  • Humana.Mente issue 3
    Vol 1 No 3 (2007)
  • Humana.Mente issue 2
    Vol 1 No 2 (2007)
  • Humana.Mente issue 1
    Vol 1 No 1 (2007)